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Religion and Psychoactive Sacraments:
An Entheogen Chrestomathy

Thomas B. Roberts, Ph.D. and Paula Jo Hruby, Ed.D.
Author Index | Title Index


The Existencial Through Psychodisleptics.

Roquet, Salvador; Favreau, Pierre L.; Ruiz de Valasco, Marcela. (1976).
No place: Albert Schweitzer Association, Psychosinthesis Institute.

ISBN: None


Description: Paperback, heavy wrapper over stapled pages, viii + 65 pages. Presented at "Humanistic Psychology in the Americas," Association for Humanistic Psychology Sixth International Conference, Cuernavaca, Mexico, Dec. 19-21, 1975.


Contents: 6 chapters.


Excerpt(s): Psychodysleptics refer to all medicaments which provoke mental dissociation at the diencephalic level, such as LSD, mescaline, psilocybin, etc. It is the term most commonly used for these substances in France and in Mexico. In the United States the more commonly used terms for the same are hallucinogens and psychedelics. (page vii)


The group session primarily takes on the outlines and distinguishing characteristics of the patient's relationship to the external world. The outlines and distinguishing characteristics of the individual sessions are meant to give the patient the experience of relationships with his internal world. Having the opportunity for both these types of experience affords the patient the greatest opportunity of experiencing love toward the external world and toward himself, and the consequence of this love, the relationship of man with his fellow beings and with himself.

Another benefit gained through the individual experience is the achievement of transpersonal experiences and, therefore, in most cases with God. (page 39)


A woman patient tells us: "I felt that my arms were stiff, that I couldn't use them as I would like to. They were paralysed for a moment. After a while, they began to soften; I felt some sort of electric energy moving my arms very softly, following the concert's beat. Energy began to have a consistency; it became like a ball that I had in my hands in the moment that I discovered with the most immense surprise of my life that all of me was love. You asked me what was the matter. I stood up, a force reaching me from above similar to the force I had in my hands only much stronger, started to pull me. The only thing I saw was light, and the only thing I felt was an irresistible attraction. God was calling me. He called me. I bent my head because I felt unworthy, insignificant. I asked God many times if he were sure it was me he called in spite of my being so insignificant. The force became more intense and I could not resist. I went; I went with him and he enveloped me. I cannot describe what I felt. The words that might approach this are happiness, totality, eternity, and I don't know what any of these mean. I only felt them at that moment." (page 59)



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